30 for 30: What 30 years in the Trenches Has Taught Me -Tony Poggiali (part 2)

Here is part two of what the last 30 years has taught me about the fitness profession/industry.  Here is part one in case you missed it.

16.  Even after three decades, the true number one reason that this still excites me is the opportunity to make a difference in someone’s life.  No matter how small that difference may be, coaches are in a position that very few people can compete with:  A daily chance to impact lives.  There was a chance that ASF was not going to continue past 2018, but I couldn’t imagine not seeing everyone on a daily basis.  In many ways, I am just getting started.

17. Continuing that thought, in addition to impacting the people in which we work with, we also have a responsibility to impact those who are just getting started.  My Miami teaching position has really opened my eyes to how unprepared young coaches can be if they don’t get practical knowledge taught to them.  Whether it is in college, internships, mentorships, or the like, we have a major role in leaving the profession in a better place than when we entered it.

18. Be true to you.  “I believe that one defines oneself by reinvention. To not be like your parents. To not be like your friends. To be yourself. To cut yourself out of stone.” Henry Rollins.  I am so far from perfect, it is laughable but I am always moving the needle in the right direction.

19. Give thanks.

20. The human body is amazing.  I think I know what to do to help people improve performance, lose weight, gain muscle and strength, get faster, etc. but how do we really know what works? We are coaches, who observe who/what is in front of us and use the knowledge that we have, and make educated guesses.  The best coaches make the best guesses.

21. Those who give freely – knowledge, advice, etc – and expect nothing in return are diamonds in the rough.  I made the mistake years ago of giving with expectation.  I still value any form of “Thank you” but know people much better now, and have more realistic expectations.

22. Passion may not be enough to make it in this profession.  The reason that I started ASF is not the reason that I continue ASF.  In the beginning, I thought it was giving people a place to train, get results and have some fun.  Now, it is those PLUS the impact, both now and in the future, that transcends just “working out”.  I get excited to coach a session but even more excited when we get to talk before or after the session.  Ironically, those conversations are mostly about non-training topics.

23.  Good times never last, neither do bad times.  I think I am lucky in that I do not get too high or too low based on any one business performance or metric.  It doesn’t mean much unless a pattern occurs.  Over the years, I have embraced the stoic response to life much more and feel it is one of the keys to long-term business success.

24.  The kind thing is always the right thing.  There are some business decisions that are based on kindness rather than making a buck.  Not every decision needs to be based on the bottom line, especially if it is done with kindness as the driver.  It is not about money at that point, but about a person.

25. Nutrition and exercise are just the beginning to long-term health and performance.  The second tier (and arguably part of the first tier) are related to genetics, hormones, metabolism, microbiome and sleep/recovery.  Each one cannot be taken for granted and expect optimal results to happen.

26.  Humble bragging is a relatively new term, (at least to me) but it applies to coaches and trainers quite a bit.  One example is when coaches post a high level college or pro athlete and take credit for their development or some other metric or quantitative accomplishment.  You certainly helped but the groundwork was already there.  Color me old-school but the athlete is front and center, the coach is the background.  Make it ALL about the them.

27.  At this point in my career/life, I only have the energy to spend on getting better, surrounding myself with people who want to get better, and feel like every day is a tangible chance to get better.  It is done, in part, to be a better business owner, coach and person for my family, but also to transfer that knowledge and wisdom to the people in my life instead of keeping it to myself.

28.  It took me a while to reach out for help but I now know that going at this alone usually does not end well.  With that being said, do some research on the person or company you are going to use as a mentor/coach.  There are some shady guys out there who are not in a position to benefit you or your business.

29.  Continuing the above thought, the team makes the difference, not the boss/owner.  We have had amazing coaches over the years and each one did the best they could. I am very grateful for each one as they are the lifeblood of ASF.  I love all of you, especially these two goofballs!  

30. In the end, there is no shortcut, no hack, no easy way.  It is hard work.  It was part of the deal when I was training people out of World Gym, and what I signed up for thirteen years ago when I completed the lease at our current location.  It has been a journey like I never would have imagined.  Mistakes, victories, rough spots, highlights.  It has all lead to this moment right here, right now.

As this concludes, I can’t help but think of what legacy will be here after I am gone….Did I do enough?  Did I impact…anybody?  Did I leave the world a better place, albeit a tiny fraction of a tiny corner? I hope so, and those questions will continue to drive me each day I awaken.

 

Thanks for reading!

 

 

For guys only – ASF Book Club

Men we have a problem. The problem is us: men. We are responsible for most of what is wrong is this world. If you ask some people, we are responsible for everything that is wrong in the world. But we also hold the solution.

If you watch any social media/television/video format, most of what you see is the “bad” side of the male species. Violence, misogyny, hatred, xenophobia, abuse, domestic issues, division, war, ego, negativity. The good in the world gets drowned out by the bad. Enough. We are better than that. The world needs to see that we can do good! More important, our families need us more than ever. To be better husbands, sons, brothers, citizens, humans.

I have been thinking about this for a long time; we have a lot of great guys at ASF who individually have great lives and stories to share. But collectively, we can lift each other up, teach each other, learn from each other, cry with each other, become a better steward for the ones we love. So, I want to start a men’s only group where we meet, talk, learn, share, get better.

The only prerequisites are open, honesty and transparency in all discussions. No inflated egos allowed. You will be asked to leave your bullshit outside so we can have real conversations about real issues.

Some of those issues include leadership, personal development, health, longevity, vitality, success, business, family, fitness, finances/wealth, masculinity, emotional IQ, happiness/joy, purpose, vocational, etc.

We will be reading {on your own} from the same book that will be assigned before the first meeting. It will form a foundation for discussion at the start of the meeting.

This will NOT be a bro-session talking about nutrition, lifting, exercise, or other issues that are similar.

You owe it to your family, your kids and the most important person of all, your self, to be the best person you can be. This will be fun, intense and challenging…kinda like an exercise session but for your mind!

WHO: ANY ASF MALE, ESPECIALLY IF YOU ARE IN A LEADERSHIP POSITION

WHERE: ASF ON TUES OR THUR FROM 7:30 PM TO 8:30 PM, STARTING IN SEPTEMBER

HOW LONG: 12 WEEKS

HOW OFTEN: BIWEEKLY

HOW MUCH: FREE, EXCEPT FOR COST OF BOOK [TBD]

 

 

Yes!  I am interested.  Please include on any future information.

 

30 for 30: What 30 years in the Trenches Has Taught Me -Tony Poggiali (part 1)

It is hard to believe that 30 years have passed since my first experience as a trainer at a local YMCA. This profession is so dynamic that new ideas, research and applications happen on a weekly basis. Here are some observations that have happened over the last three decades:

  1. The more I know, the less I know.  It is almost embarrassing what I did in the past; it was all I knew at the time.  Each week/month/year is a chance to get better and I love the process of learning and evolving.
  2. The basics, done consistently, still rule.  Strength train, play, move, elevate your heart rate, play, eat single-ingredient foods (most of the time), play.
  3. Training and coaching are similar, but not the same.  I believe the biggest distinction lies in the relationships that coaches are obligated to develop and nurture, while training is more of a job/profession that is a part of the bigger picture of a coaching environment.  I would like to think that I am a better coach now than just a trainer.
  4. The internet (and social media) changed everything.  For better or for worse, training and exercise information is ubiquitous now, as are facility options, qualified (and unqualified) coaches and trainers.  You do not need to go to college, get a degree/certification or really train people to “make it”.  If you have a phone, you have a chance.
  5. The backyard “training facility” is slowly going away.  Physical literacy and competency used to be taught in the neighborhood and, to a lesser extent, in schools.  It is where I learned every skill needed to be a good athlete as a kid and enjoy fitness as an adult.
  6. Opening, operating and running a business is much harder than I ever imagined.  It is no wonder that the churn rate for fitness businesses is so high.  It is cutthroat out there and can suck the life out of you if you let it.  After 13 years of Adrenaline Sports & Fitness’ existence, I still have a lot to learn.
  7. Trainers are a commodity; coaches are a unicorn.  I sound like a snob saying that but the profession needs more great people who can coach than people who can train.
  8. It took a while, but figuring out the Why of everything pointed my compass in the right direction.  Now I know the deeper reason of coaching athletes and adults.  It is to make an impact in their lives, to help them find their awesomeness and to be part of their framily.
  9. Sports sampling is good parenting.  I am certainly not telling you how to raise your children.  However, the vast majority of research supports exposing young kids to as many different activities/sports at young ages as possible.  So far, my nine year old has tried baseball, football, jiu-jitsu, karate, road running, swimming, tae kwon do, soccer and water polo.  Additionally, she plays for hours at a time just being a goofy kid.  This summer she will attempt her first triathlon.  Some sports she does a few months, and others are going on a few years.  The take-home message is she will be much more balanced and learn different gross motor skills and reduce injuries because of the number of activities she has tried.
  10. The more I learn about the human body, the less I know.  Since the sequencing of the human genome, we know more about us, humans, than ever before.  It still feels that we know so little though.  How do we really know how the brain works?  How diseases progress?  Why do some people age faster than others?  Is everything genetically determined?  How much control do we really have?  Do zombies exist?
  11. Walking is more important than previously thought.  As a form of activity, walking is pretty low on the “cool” scale. But, the benefits on overall health are impressive, especially stress reduction, reducing sympathetic states, getting some vitamin D exposure, enjoying nature, unplugging from technology, reducing cortisol levels…the list is endless. I used to think it was a waste of time, now I look at it as a necessity.
  12. The profession seems to be in a good place.  Opportunities are everywhere, from a physical brick-and-mortar facility to online options to social media.  The number of options for athletes and adults are numerous and it may come down to “test driving” multiple businesses before you find the best fit.  The quality of the coaching landscape continues to rise with each year; however, there is a tipping point where the quantity of new coaches cannot keep pace with the dynamic demands of being a great coach and will eventually leave or burnout.
  13. Technology will continue to disrupt the fitness landscape.  In a not-too-distant future, a robot may greet you, scan your retina and personalize your training and nutrition experience.  AR, AI and VR have already invaded the human space of fitness and will continue to nudge it’s way into fitness facilities worldwide.
  14. Coaching helps parenting and parenting helps coaching.  I realized this about four years ago (and even wrote about it); there is a direct transfer to how you raise a child to how you coach an athlete.  Coach Macdonald, who wrote a piece earlier this month also has learned the degree of transfer.  He will only improve his coaching skills now that his daughter was born.
  15. With more information at our fingertips than ever before, recovery is making a strong push to the forefront.  Training has only so may new ideas and concepts; nutrition is still figuring itself out; the last frontier is the scientific and practical way to recover from training, where true adaptations take place.  Everything from sleep to cryotherapy to supplementation and more will challenge training and nutrition for the lead in the quest for ultimate results and the perfect body.

Part 2 will be following soon…

The “Why” of Why I Love to Coach – Alice Smith

We all choose a path in life. We choose to study a particular subject in school, we choose a career that we think will make us happy. We choose to get married or stay single. We choose.

When asked “why” I made my career choice, it took me a minute to find the words for an answer. You see, it’s kind of complex.

When I went to college, I honestly didn’t know what I wanted to do with my life. I had lots of hobbies and things that I enjoyed, but nothing really struck me on the head as a lifelong career path.

So I went in on the wrong boat. I started in an arts and humanities program- but after only a few months realized it was not for me. I couldn’t handle the blood and guts of nursing (my next attempt at a major), so I went to an advisor defeated.

My advisor told me about the kinesiology program, which focused around the study of human movement. The more we talked, the more I was interested. I loved the idea of working with kids and teaching them how to create healthy habits while simultaneously unleashing their athletic potential. I bought in.

 

For the first time in my collegiate career, classes were interesting and fun.

I was learning so much and loving it. I took an internship with MSU Spartan Performance, where I was able to really grow as a trainer- working with athletes of all sports, ages, and sizes. After a few months, I took over the strength programs of two public high schools. I worked closest with a varsity football team as their strength and conditioning coach, which solidified that this is what I want to do with my life.

 

 

Early in my days in charge of a school S&C program, a cheerleader came to the weight room distraught. Her parents were in the midst of a messy divorce, her brother had left home for good without warning, and she was picked on at school. She was defeated- and she broke down.

As we talked, I realized that I had no control what happened to this athlete outside of the weight room walls. I couldn’t knock down kids for bullying her, tell her parents to keep her away from the drama, or call up her brother.

But I could make that hour, that 1/24 part of her day, enjoyable. I could do my best to help her forget all of the crap happening outside, and have fun.

I love training. Pushing kids towards their potential and watching them see results is so rewarding. But it was at that moment that I realized why I show up every single day.

At that moment, with that cheerleader, I was more than a coach/intern/college kid. I was a life line for her, and she needed me to show up for her.

We’ve all had various experiences with coaches in our lives. Some of us have had coaches that we hated- that aggressively drilled us into the ground with endless suicides and burpees. On the other hand, some of us have had coaches that changed us- not just in athletic technique, but in life. I never had a coach like that. I didn’t have someone who would just sit and let me vent for five minutes. I want to be that for these kids.

Being a coach is so much more than agility and lifting. It can be life changing if done properly. If I can make a difference in even just one athlete’s day, I am doing my job, and that’s why I do this.

How Having A Baby Made Me A Better Coach – Brian MacDonald

 

“Brian! I think I’m pregnant!”, my wife abruptly wakes me with at roughly 6:30 in the morning, and understandably so. Those of you who really know me, I am the antithesis of a morning person. I am the classic “don’t talk to me until I have my caffeine” type of person, so all I could muster from my zombie self was, “Whoa…..” We had just started trying for a kid, so I was obviously excited, just had to be a little more conscious to process those words.

The ensuing change I have gone through since then has been life changing to say the least.

Though I won’t truly realize it until our baby girl comes, I had a dramatic increase in selflessness.

I found myself thinking to myself that it is no longer about me or just my wife and I.

While we were having the conversation about having a child, that was the biggest hurdle we had to accept, that we had to make the necessary sacrifices such as going out for dinner and drinks at the drop of a hat, or suddenly deciding we want to go to Glacier National Park without a worry in the world just to name a couple of examples.

My daily thoughts shifted from protocols I needed to finish for athletes or plans we had for the weekend to what can I do to make this pregnancy as comfortable as possible for my wife or fear of all that could go wrong because all I want is a healthy baby and healthy wife to come out of this.

Free time was suddenly consumed with projects for the nursery or just general projects to prepare the house for a new permanent guest.

Long story short, I no longer thought of myself, and I was completely okay with it.

The point of this post is to talk about how coaching has helped me prepare for this pregnancy and soon raising a child.

Dealing with athletes primarily between the ages of 9 and 14 all day every day for almost 6 years now has tested my patience like nothing I’ve ever experienced.

Whether it be one who has constant behavioral issues always interrupting the class, or others who just don’t seem to be understanding the skill I am trying to coach, patience is an absolute must when dealing with kids. Bottom line is we have to be patient and understanding as coaches.

These have been the two most important traits I have utilized throughout this pregnancy, and two that I know will come in handy when our baby comes. The other big one is empathy.

The ability to understand and share the feelings of another is critical when it comes to coaching. When an athlete comes in showing all signs of being down and having a miserable day, it is our job to recognize and make it abundantly clear to that athlete that we understand them and are there to help in whatever way we can.

I obviously can’t possibly share the discomfort my wife is going through while growing a human being, I can do my best to listen and try to understand, just like I would do with an athlete who is feeling down.

These past 9 months have been a wonderful and revealing experience for my wife and I. I feel that I have excelled as a person through this and having coached athletes for the past 6 years has undoubtedly helped me prepare for this and the future of fatherhood.

January 2018 updates

Now that you have stopped laughing from my vintage 80’s fashion sense, here are a few updates to start the new year:

    • The annual Challenge is now in its sixth year.  It has been so much fun each year and we would love for you to join us if you haven’t already.  Our big focus this year is on sustainable habits and behaviors.  Knowing what to do isn’t always the issue but the strategies on how to do it are where we can help!  For more information, check out the Challenge page link.
    • Effective January 2018, the monthly rate for 12 month ATHLETE agreements will increase to $169/month. Since we opened 12 years ago, the annual rate has not changed; while it will increase, we feel it is still a great value.

      There will be a grace period if you would like to lock in your current rate for another 12 months. Please complete the necessary paperwork by January 15, 2018. This applies to 12 month agreements only. If choose not to act by January 15th, 2018, the higher rate will apply should you renew after that date.

  • Please welcome Alice Smith, new performance coach.  Born and raised in Michigan, Alice just completed her degree from Michigan State, majoring in Kinesiology.  Alice played multiple sports in high school and college and just moved to the area in January. She enjoys photography, is a practicing musician and craaaaazy MSU fan!

Finally, we have moved most of our communication to social media outlets, at the expense of email and blog posts.  If you would like to follow us, here are links:

Instagram

Facebook

Twitter

YouTube

 

Meet Rebecca Bryant, UC intern for the summer

I’m Rebecca, a girl who grew up playing sports and had plenty of siblings to laugh with, play with, and of course, occasionally fight with. My parents got divorced when I was 2 years old, so I don’t remember ever living with both parents. I used to wonder how things would have been if they stayed together, but then I remember how great they both have always been as parents, and I try not to question it.

Also, I believe that everything happens for a reason, and even through the bad things that happen, we can always find some good in them, even if we have to dig a little deeper. My parents had 5 children together, I am the youngest. They both got remarried and I now have 9 siblings, 5 brothers and 4 sisters – I think it’s pretty neat that we ended up with an even split with the boys and girls.

 

Life has had its ups and downs, as each person can testify to their own life. For me, I have been as low as depression and thinking that my life wasn’t worth living, to being so grateful for the ways that God has blessed me and kept me that I couldn’t imagine giving up.

I am currently a summer intern and I will have earned my MS in Health Promotion and Education with a concentration in Exercise and Fitness at the end of the summer. I don’t know exactly where I will be after this, I’m just trying to find the best way to do what I love and help as many people as possible.

Growing up, I was always very shy and I would leave my comfort zone as little as possible. As I have grown and matured, I have realized the importance of helping and serving others, which has forced me to see the necessity of coming out of my comfort zone more and more if I am going to reach my full potential in that area. At this point in my life, even with so much more to live, I get so much more out of helping others and seeing others smile than ever before, so that fuels me and gives me that extra boost to leave my comfort zone.

There is one major thing that I have done that has pushed me the furthest out of my comfort zone but has also been the most rewarding, and that is coaching. This surprised me because I never dreamed of coaching. I was pushed to coach by my high school basketball coach – just a reminder that sometimes others see things in us before we see them.

If there was one thing that I could share with someone that reflects who I am and I thought could help them, I would tell them to approach every moment in a way that not only makes them proud, but to those that they hope to influence and inspire, to make them proud, as well.

Here is a quick video that Rebecca put together to share who she is and what her future holds:

Results v. Habits

This is a timely post for ASF; our annual Challenge results are pouring in, with the vast majority showing improvements in body composition.  In our group page on Facebook, the conversations range from a few sentences to a few paragraphs, with a common thread of honesty, transparency and openness.

It has been amazing to see how people have transformed their bodies, but also transforming their entire lives.  My hope is that the six weeks isn’t exclusively about body composition changes but also that of permanent behavior change.  It would be fun to do another quasi Challenge in six months to see how many of those positive habits are still going strong!

Before I continue, I would like to share a brief history of how I came to my current habits, which started a long time ago, in a basement not far away…

Circa 1985, I was about 11o pounds as a teenager.  I had to sleep with padding on my hip bones because they protruded so much.  I played 5 hours every day after school (This was the foundation for my habit of loving activity).  It was not a coincidence that I could not gain weight!  You probably hate people like that?! My first weight set was filled with sand, made out of plastic.  While I was inspired by the muscle magazines at the time, I was equally inspired by my father who would do hundreds of sit ups and push ups every morning.  His 25 pound dumbells may have well been 125 pounds!  I was determined to lift those things!

Now, I had another habit brewing:  Structured exercise, in the form of lifting weights.  It was structured in the sense that I was doing it but I had no idea what I was doing; a typical “routine” was to lift for a few hours or until my parents would call me upstairs. Embedded within the act of lifting weights was several other habits:  discipline, motivation and reward.

As I was devouring every magazine available (there was no internet at the time), I also became very conscious of how and what I ate.  I ate extremely clean with minimal processed food, took every supplement I could afford and slowly started to reap the benefits.  You guessed it: My nutritional habits were born.  By the end of high school, I was a whopping 135 pounds but had built a foundation of strength through powerlifting.  As I entered my late teens and ventured off to college, the best was yet to come.

As I was studying physiology, biomechanics, physics and nutrition, I was able to formulate my own training philosophy of what worked best for me.  My unique formula, you might say.  The habit I was developing was the constant and continuous desire to learn more, to get better. Miami was also the place where I first competed in bodybuilding.  My first show was a disaster; I had no idea what to do.  The next show I won the whole contest.  The habit formed was to never give up if you fail, but to learn from it and move on.

Fast forward to my late forties and many of those same habits guide me today.  While I can’t expect you turn back time and change your childhood, there are some key lessons to ponder when you look back over the last few decades; can you identify patterns in your life that lead to your habits today?

=======================================================================================

Another way to look at habits….

Let’s say there are two scenarios:

Scenario 1:  Goal was to lose 15 pounds over 6 weeks, only lost 8 pounds but developed 3 new habits.

Scenario 2:  Goal was to lose 15 pounds over 6 weeks, lost 16 pounds (great job!) but did NOT develop any new habits.

Which would you choose?  They both lost weight over the six weeks, which is a victory unto itself.  But scenario 2 will likely see failure in the near future and fall back into their old ways.  Scenario 1 is now developing permanent lifestyle change that will become keystone habits, allowing future changes to continue.

Speaking of keystone habits, that is where it all starts.  Charles Duhigg coined the term, Keystone Habits, that is the foundation for all other habits.  One good habit can beget other good habits.  If you get up early to exercise, you are productive and eat better that day and sleep better that night.  As I write this, I know it will lead to other productive outlets today.  Can you identify a keystone habit?  If so, let me know what other habits it improves.

What you may find is that the real change happens within, not the habit itself.  When you reward yourself for the outcome, you are missing a vital ingredient to the habit chain, which is the process.  Yes, you look better with that extra 20 pounds off your body but your identity is more than your appearance.  Using the early morning example from above:  If you show up at 5:30 am to train, here are some habits (i.e. the process) that went into that occurring:

  1. Likely retired early the night before.
  2. Woke up when you really wanted to sleep.
  3. Put on your workout clothes (which you set by the bed the night before).
  4. Got in your car, in the dark, half asleep, and drove.
  5. Pulled into the parking lot and got out of the car.

So, a lot happened before you even exercised!  ALWAYS REWARD YOURSELF.

Showing up is the result.  Working out is the result.

 

Maybe this inspired you to rethink how the last six weeks changed you.  More importantly, how the next six months, six years will look like.

The joy/curse of putting things off

Disclaimer:  There is a slight difference between being kind to someone and being nice to someone.  Being nice is telling people what they want to hear; being kind is telling someone what they need to hear.  This post is the latter.  It may offend you.  It still comes from the heart, written with love. 

The psychological economy of instant gratification of the American population over the last few decades  is starting to catch up with us.  See how many of these you are guilty of doing in the past ten years:

Using a credit card [icon name=”check-circle” class=”” unprefixed_class=””]

Starting a diet [icon name=”check-circle” class=”” unprefixed_class=””]

Drinking alcohol [icon name=”check-circle” class=”” unprefixed_class=””]

Using tobacco in some form [icon name=”check-circle” class=”” unprefixed_class=””]

Fluctuating between an active lifestyle, and not-so-active lifestyle [icon name=”check-circle” class=”” unprefixed_class=””]

Accumulating less and less quality sleep [icon name=”check-circle” class=”” unprefixed_class=””]

Most of you have done most of these.  It doesn’t make you a bad person.  But it can lead to a habit of “your brain writing a check that your ass can’t cash” mentality.

It is a mindset of do now, pay later.  Examples include financing a 65″ television (when your 2014 model still works fine); starting a diet and exercise program in January (because of the gluttony of the holidays); swearing that you will never drink again (after you streak down the highway)…you get the idea.  At some point, you are going to have to pay the price for your past behaviors, whether they are acute (a night of hard drinking) or chronic (sleep debt), something has to give.

We are so good at being reactive, we have forgotten how to be proactive.  There is a rush of adrenaline (no pun intended) and other chemicals when we make these lifestyle withdrawals.  In an effort to repeat those feelings, we get caught in a web of repeating those withdrawals, and shoving down the fact that the payback will come later.  Maybe tomorrow, maybe the end of the month, maybe next year, but it will come LATER.  We are a nation of LATER.

I will join the gym LATER, but right now I am too busy.

I will pay off this _______ LATER, but right now, I want it.  That’s what this credit card is for, right?

I will start this diet LATER, but right now, I will just buy bigger pants.

I will sleep LATER, but right now, I have to get this paperwork finished.

I will chase my dreams LATER, but right now, I have a full house, work long hours and put my needs second.

*** Some LATERS are necessary as they are sacrifices as part of a greater process to make the Big Picture become a reality .  This is different.

Not only will these all catch up to you, and a payment will be needed, the worst result of these becomes an even more horrifying outcome: REGRET.

REGRET that you never got in shape.

REGRET that you are in financial debt.

REGRET that you have become an alcoholic.

REGRET that you didn’t chase an opportunity, dream, business, risk.

Frankly, I am sick of it.  I am just as busy as you; I have the same 24 hours that you do; I am not willing to live with REGRET.  Are you?

 

 

When it comes to health and fitness, this is the mantra~

I want to eat as bad as possible, do as little as possible and look as good as possible, 

This may not be said, but it is thought.  This stuff is hard, and you will self-talk your way out of it any chance you get.  We are not wired to lose weight and exercise; it is in our biology to gain weight and preserve our energy, not expend it.  We only need enough calories and enough activity to procreate, in terms of our species’ existence.

Consider that the odds to even become a human being are 400,000,000,000 to 1.  There are no greater odds you will face than those.  Now, consider that you have about 75 years on this earth, give or take, to do something with your life.  For some of you, myself included, that means that you are on the “back nine” of your time on earth.  Stop with all the LATER bullshit, and start with the NOW.

Here are easy NOW things to incorporate ~

Move as often as possible, in as many ways as possible.  In your home, outside, at a gym, just move!

Stop all negative internal dialogue.  You are not ugly.  You are not dumb.  You are not too old.  You are not special.  You are not that scared.

Believe in yourself and make your dent in the universe.

Relax.  The world does not revolve around you and your problems.  A year from now, those problems won’t even be remembered.

Determine what your legacy will be and what you want to be remembered for at your funeral.  Reverse engineer and start doing that stuff now.  This is heavy shit so take some time.
I will wait.

 

 

 

Let’s get PHIT! How Trump’s election may help the fitness industry

First, if you are looking for the latest tips on burning fat, getting stronger, running faster or diet-of-the-week, you can close this page now.  If you are looking for a political post, this is kinda, sorta, maybe for you.  Read on to see why…

The PHIT (Physical Health Investment Today) Act has been in limbo since 2006, when it was first presented to Congress.  It was designed for the general public to save 20-30% on the costs associated with physical activity, such as exercise classes, memberships, personal training, sports dues and fees, etc. No longer would cost be (such) a prohibitive factor for individuals and families to get healthy.

The PHIT Act would make this a reality by allowing people to use existing pretax health savings accounts (HSAs are medical savings accounts available to U.S. citizens enrolled in a high-deductible health plan) and flexible savings accounts (FSAs are funds set aside for certain healthcare costs that are not taxed) for fitness and sports related expenses.  These funds are typically used for medical expenses; PHIT aims to use those funds for prevention and proactive expenses.  If passed, the bill would allow individuals
up to $1000 annually to be set aside for physical activity and fitness expenses.

It has been a slow climb in the last decade but the newly elected administration may finally be the break that is needed for its passage.  The Trump regime seek to improve the Affordable Care Act (via modifying, or repealing/replacing it), opening the door for expanded use of HSAs. Democrats generally don’t favor the use of HSAs or FLAs.  However, this bill has generally been a bipartisan topic with roughly equal members sponsoring its approval.

Stay tuned to see how this will play out.  You may not like the new President but he may directly affect how fitness and health outcomes are being paid.